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Detail CISCO DSLAM

Detail CISCO DSLAM

User EXEC Mode

When you log in to the Cisco DSLAM, you are in user EXEC, or simply EXEC, command mode. The EXEC mode commands available at the user level are a subset of those available at the privileged level. The user EXEC mode commands allow you to connect to remote switches, change terminal settings on a temporary basis, perform basic tests, and list system information.

The user EXEC mode prompt consists of the DSLAM host name followed by the angle bracket (>):

Frodo>

or

DSLAM>

The default host name is DSLAM, unless it has been changed through use of the host name global configuration command.
Privileged EXEC Mode

The privileged EXEC mode command set includes all user EXEC mode commands and the configure command, through which you can access global configuration mode and the remaining configuration submodes. Privileged EXEC mode also includes high-level testing commands, such as debug, and commands that display potentially secure information.

To enter or exit privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps:

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM> enable

Password:password

Enter privileged EXEC mode from EXECmode.1
Step 2

DSLAM#

Enter privileged EXEC commands.
Step 3

DSLAM# disable

DSLAM>

Exit privileged EXEC mode and return to EXEC mode.2
1The prompt changes to the DSLAM host name followed by the pound sign (#).
2The prompt changes back to the DSLAM host name followed by the angle bracket (>).

The system administrator uses the enable password global configuration command to set the password, which is case sensitive. If an enable password was not set, you can access privileged EXEC mode only from the console.
ROM Monitor Mode

ROM monitor mode provides access to a basic system kernel, from which you can boot the Cisco DSLAM or perform diagnostic tests. The system can enter ROM mode automatically if the Cisco DSLAM does not find a valid system image, or if the configuration file is corrupted. The ROM monitor prompt is rommon x> without the DSLAM host name. The x represents the number of commands entered into the prompt.

You can also enter ROM monitor mode by interrupting the boot sequence with the Break key during loading.

To return to EXEC mode from ROM monitor mode, use the cont command:

rommon 1> cont

DSLAM>

Global Configuration Mode

Global configuration mode provides access to commands that apply to the entire system. From global configuration mode you can also enter the other configuration modes described in these sections.

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure

or

DSLAM# configure terminal
Enter global configuration mode from privileged EXEC mode.
Step 2

Configuring from terminal, memory,

or network [terminal]?

This prompt appears only if you use the first option in Step 1. Specify the source of the configuration commands at the prompt. You can specify the terminal, NVRAM, or a file stored on a network server as the source of configuration commands. The default is to enter commands from the terminal console.
Step 3

DSLAM(config)#

Enter configuration commands.1
Step 4

DSLAM(config)# exit

Exit global configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode.
1The prompt changes to (config)#.
Interface Configuration Mode

Interface configuration mode provides access to commands that apply to an interface. Use these commands to modify the operation of an interface such as an ATM, Ethernet, or asynchronous port.

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# interface interface-type

interface-number

Enter interface configuration mode from global configuration mode.1
Step 3

DSLAM(config-if)# exit

Exit interface configuration mode and return to global configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXEC mode.
1The prompt changes to (config-if)#.
Profile Configuration Mode

Profile configuration mode provides access to DSL profile commands. (See “Configuring Digital Subscriber Lines”.)

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# dsl-profile profile-name

Enter profile configuration mode and specify a profile.1
Step 3

DSLAM(cfg-dsl-profile)# exit

Exit profile mode and return to global configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXEC mode.
1The prompt changes to (cfg-dsl-profile)#.
Line Configuration Mode

Line configuration mode provides access to commands used to configure lines on the DSLAM.

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# line line-index

Enter line configuration mode from global configuration mode.1
Step 3

DSLAM(config-line)# exit

Exit profile mode and return to global configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXEC mode.
1The prompt changes to (config-line)#.
ATM Router Configuration Mode

ATM router configuration mode provides access to commands used to configure Private Network-to-Network Interface (PNNI) routing.

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# atm router pnni

Enter ATM router configuration mode from global configuration mode.1
Step 3

DSLAM(config-atm-router)# exit

Exit ATM router configuration mode and return to global configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXEC mode.
1The prompt changes to (config-atm-router)#.
PNNI Node Configuration Mode

The PNNI node configuration mode is a submode of ATM router configuration mode and provides access to commands you use to configure PNNI nodes on the Cisco DSLAM.

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# atm router pnni

Enter ATM router configuration mode from global configuration mode.1
Step 3

DSLAM(config-atm-router)# node

node-index

Enter PNNI node configuration mode from ATM router configuration mode.2
Step 4

DSLAM(config-pnni-node)# exit

Exit PNNI node configuration mode and return to ATM router configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXEC mode.
1The prompt changes to (config-atm-router)#.
2The prompt changes to (config-pnni-node)#.
Auto-sync Configuration Mode

The auto-sync configuration mode is a submode for automatically synchronizing the configuration/flash between the Cisco primary and secondary redundant NI-2s.

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# auto-sync

Enter auto-sync configuration mode.1
Step 3

DSLAM(config-auto-sync)# file

Enter the configuration or flash file that you want to be automatically synchronized.
Step 4

DSLAM(config-auto-sync)# exit

Exit auto-sync configuration mode and return to global configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXEC mode.
1The prompt changes to (config-auto-sync)#.
Redundancy Configuration Mode

The redundancy configuration mode provides access to commands used to configure redundancy on the DSLAM.

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# redundancy

Enter redundancy configuration mode from global configuration mode.1
Step 3

DSLAM(config-red)# exit

Exit redundancy configuration mode and return to global configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXEC mode.
1The prompt changes to (config-red)#.
VRF Configuration Mode

The VPN routing/forwarding instance (VRF) configuration mode provides access to commands used to configure a VRF on the DSLAM.

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# ip vrf vrf-name

Enter VRF configuration mode from global configuration mode.1
Step 3

DSLAM(config-vrf)# exit

Exit VRF configuration mode and return to global configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXEC mode.
1The prompt changes to (config-vrf)#.
DHCP Pool Configuration Mode

The DHCP configuration mode provides access to commands used to configure a DHCP server on the DSLAM.

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# ip dhcp pool name

Enter DHCP pool configuration mode from global configuration mode.1
Step 3

DSLAM(config-dhcp)# exit

Exit DHCP configuration mode and return to global configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXEC mode.
1The prompt changes to (config-dhcp)#.
ATM Accounting File Configuration Mode

ATM accounting file configuration mode provides access to commands used to configure a file for accounting and billing of virtual circuits (VCs).

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# atm accounting file

accounting-filename

Enter ATM accounting file configuration mode from global configuration mode.1
Step 3

DSLAM(config-acct-file)# exit

Exit ATM accounting file configuration mode and return to global configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXEC mode.
1The prompt changes to (config-acct-file)#.
ATM Accounting Selection Configuration Mode

ATM accounting selection configuration mode provides access to commands used to specify the connection data to be gathered from the DSLAM.

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# atm accounting selection

accounting-selection-index

Enter ATM accounting selection configuration mode from global configuration mode.1
Step 3

DSLAM(config-acct-sel)# exit

Exit ATM accounting selection configuration mode and return to global configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXECmode.
1The prompt changes to (config-acct-sel)#.
ATM E.164 Translation Table Configuration Mode

ATM E.164 translation table configuration mode provides access to commands that you use to configure the translation table that maps native E.164 format addresses to ATM end system (AESA) format addresses.

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# atm e164 translation-table

Enter ATM E.164 translation table configuration mode from global configuration mode.1
Step 3

DSLAM(config-atm-e164)# exit

Exit ATM E.164 translation table configuration mode and return to global configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXECmode.
1The prompt changes to (config-atm-e164)#.
ATM Signaling Diagnostics Configuration Mode

ATM signaling diagnostics configuration mode provides access to commands used to configure the signaling diagnostics table.

Command Task
Step 1

DSLAM# configure terminal

Go to global configuration mode.
Step 2

DSLAM(config)# atm signalling diagnostics

Enter ATM signaling diagnostics configuration mode.
Step 3

DSLAM(cfg-atmsig-diag)# exit

Exit ATM signaling diagnostics configuration mode and return to global configuration mode. Enter end to return to privileged EXECmode.

Using Context-Sensitive Help

The user interface provides context-sensitive help in all modes. This section describes how to configure and display context-sensitive help.
Configuring Help for Terminal Sessions

The following commands configure full help.
Command Task

DSLAM# terminal full-help

In privileged EXEC mode, configure the current terminal session to receive help for the full set of user-level commands.

DSLAM(config-line)# full-help

In line configuration mode, configure a specific line to allow users without privileged access to obtain full help.

Displaying Context-Sensitive Help

To get help specific to a command mode, a command, a keyword, or an argument, perform one of these tasks:
Command Task

help

Obtain a brief description of the help system in any command mode.

abbreviated-command-entry?

Obtain a list of commands that begin with a particular character string.

abbreviated-command-entry

Complete a partial command name.

?

List all commands available for a particular command mode.

command ?

List the associated keywords of a command.

command keyword ?

List the associated arguments of a keyword.

To view a list of commands that begin with a particular character sequence, type those characters followed immediately by the question mark (?). Do not include a space. This form of help is called word help, because it completes a word for you.

In this example, the system displays the possible commands in privileged EXEC mode that begin with “co.”

DSLAM# co?

configure connect copy

This form helps you determine the minimum subset that you can use to abbreviate a command.
Command Syntax Help

To list keywords or arguments, enter a question mark (?) in place of a keyword or argument. Include a space before the ?. This form of help is called command syntax help, because it reminds you which keywords or arguments are applicable based on the command, keywords, and arguments you have already entered.

This example demonstrates the use of command syntax help to complete the access-list command. Entering the question mark (?) displays the allowed arguments:

DSLAM(config)# access-list ?

<1-99> IP standard access list

<100-199> IP extended access list

Enter the access list number, 99, followed by a question mark (?) to display the allowed keywords:

DSLAM(config)# access-list 99 ?

deny Specify packets to reject

permit Specify packets to forward

Enter the deny argument followed by a question mark (?) to display the next argument (host name or IP address) and two keywords:

DSLAM(config)# access-list 99 deny ?

Hostname or A.B.C.D Address to match

any Any source host

host A single host address

Enter the IP address followed by a question mark (?) to display a final (optional) argument. The indicates that you can press Return to execute the command:

DSLAM(config)# access-list 99 deny 131.108.134.0 ?

A.B.C.D Wildcard bits

DSLAM(config)#

The system adds an entry to access list 99 that denies access to all hosts on subnet 131.108.134.0.
Checking Command Syntax

The user interface provides an error indicator (^) that appears in the command string in which you have entered an incorrect or incomplete command, keyword, or argument.

This example shows a command entry that is correct up to the last element:

DSLAM# clock set 13:04:30 28 apr 98

^

% Invalid input detected at ‘^’ marker.

The caret symbol (^) and help response indicate the location in which the error occurs. To list the correct syntax, re-enter the command, substituting a question mark (?) where the error occurred:

DSLAM# clock set 13:32:00 23 February ?

<1993-2035> Year

DSLAM# clock set 13:32:00 23 February

Enter the year, using the correct syntax, and press Enter to execute the command:

DSLAM# clock set 13:32:00 23 February 1993

Using the Command History Features

The user interface provides a history or record of commands you enter. You can use the command history feature for recalling long or complex commands or entries, including access lists. With the command history feature, you can complete the tasks in the following sections:

* Setting the Command History Buffer Size
* Recalling Commands
* Disabling the Command History Feature

Setting the Command History Buffer Size

By default, the system records ten command lines in its history buffer. Use the following commands to set the number of command lines the system records:
Command Task

DSLAM# terminal history [size

number-of-lines]

In privileged EXEC mode, enable the command history feature for the current terminal session.

DSLAM(config-line)# history

[size number-of-lines]

In line configuration mode, enable the command history feature for a specific line.

Recalling Commands

To recall commands from the history buffer, perform one of these tasks:
Key Sequence/Command Task
Press Ctrl-P or the Up Arrow key.1 Recall commands in the history buffer, beginning with the most recent command. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively older commands.
Press Ctrl-N or the Down Arrow key.1 Return to more recent commands in the history buffer after recalling commands with Ctrl-P or the Up Arrow key. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively more recent commands.

DSLAM> show

history

While in EXEC mode, list the last several commands you have just entered.
1The arrow keys function only on ANSI-compatible terminals such as VT100s.
Disabling the Command History Feature

The command history feature is automatically enabled. Use the following commands to disable it:
Command Task

DSLAM> terminal no

history

In EXEC mode, disable the command history feature for the current terminal session.

DSLAM(config-line)

# no history

In line configuration mode, configure the line to disable the command history feature.
Enabling Enhanced Editing Mode

Although the current software release enables the enhanced editing mode by default, you can disable it and revert to the editing mode of previous software releases. Use the following commands to re-enable the enhanced editing mode:
Command Task

DSLAM> terminal
editing

In EXEC mode, enable the enhanced editing features for the current terminal session.

DSLAM(config-line)
# editing

In line configuration mode, enable the enhanced editing features for a specific line.

Moving Around on the Command Line

Use these keystrokes to move the cursor around on the command line for corrections or changes:
Keystrokes Task
1The arrow keys function only on ANSI-compatible terminals such as VT100s.
Completing a Partial Command Name

If you cannot remember a complete command name, you can use Tab to allow the system to complete a partial entry:
Keystrokes Task

If your keyboard does not have Tab, press Ctrl-I instead.

In this example, when you enter the letters conf and press Tab, the system provides the complete command:

DSLAM# conf

DSLAM# configure

If you enter an ambiguous set of characters, the system generates an error message. To display the list of legal commands beginning with the specified string, enter a question mark (?) after you see the error message. See the “Using Word Help” section.
Pasting in Buffer Entries

The system provides a buffer that contains the last ten items you deleted. You can recall these items and paste them in the command line by using these keystrokes:
Keystrokes Task

The buffer contains only the last ten items you have deleted or cut. If you press Esc Y more than 10 times, you cycle back to the first buffer entry.
Editing Command Lines that Wrap

The new editing command set provides a wraparound feature for commands that extend beyond a single line on the screen. When the cursor reaches the right margin, the command line shifts 10 spaces to the left. You cannot see the first 10 characters of the line, but you can scroll back and check the syntax at the beginning of the command. To scroll back, use these keystrokes:
Keystrokes Task
1The arrow keys function only on ANSI-compatible terminals such as VT100s.

In the following example, the access-list command entry extends beyond one line. When the cursor reaches the end of the line, the line is shifted ten spaces to the left and redisplayed. The dollar sign ($) indicates that the line has been scrolled to the left. Each time the cursor reaches the end of the line, the line is again shifted ten spaces to the left.

DSLAM(config)# access-list 101 permit tcp 131.108.2.5 255.255.255.0 131.108.1

DSLAM(config)# $ 101 permit tcp 131.108.2.5 255.255.255.0 131.108.1.20 255.25

DSLAM(config)# $t tcp 131.108.2.5 255.255.255.0 131.108.1.20 255.255.255.0 eq

DSLAM(config)# $108.2.5 255.255.255.0 131.108.1.20 255.255.255.0 eq 45

When you complete the entry, press Ctrl-A to check the complete syntax before pressing Return to execute the command. The dollar sign ($) appears at the end of the line to indicate that the line has scrolled to the right:

DSLAM(config)# access-list 101 permit tcp 131.108.2.5 255.255.255.0 131.108.1$

The Cisco DSLAM default is a terminal screen that is 80 columns wide. If you have a width other than that, use the terminal width command to provide the correct width.

Use line wrapping together with the command history feature to recall and modify previous complex command entries.
Deleting Entries

Use any of these keystrokes to delete command entries if you make a mistake or change your mind:
Keystrokes Task

Scrolling Down a Line or a Screen

When you use the help facility to list the commands available in a particular mode, the list is often longer than the terminal screen can display. In such cases, a More prompt appears at the bottom of the screen. To respond to the More prompt, use these keystrokes:
Keystrokes Task

Redisplaying the Current Command Line

If you enter a command and a message appears on your screen, you can easily recall your current command line entry. To do so, use these keystrokes:
Keystrokes Task

Transposing Mistyped Characters

If you have mistyped a command entry, you can transpose the mistyped characters by using these keystrokes:
Keystrokes Task

Controlling Capitalization

You can capitalize or lowercase words or capitalize a set of letters with these keystrokes:
Keystrokes Task

Designating a Keystroke as a Command Entry

To use a particular keystroke as an executable command, insert a system code:

Keystrokes Task

Disabling Enhanced Editing Mode

To disable enhanced editing mode and revert to the editing mode, use this command in privileged EXEC mode:
Command Task

DSLAM# terminal no
editing

Disable the enhanced editing features for the local line.

If you have prebuilt scripts that do not interact well when enhanced editing is enabled, you can disable enhanced editing mode. To re-enable enhanced editing mode, use the terminal editing command.
Ending a Session

After you use the setup command or another configuration command, exit the Cisco DSLAM and quit the session.

To end a session, use this EXEC command:
Command Task

DSLAM> quit

End the session.

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